Documentary Network – Watch free documentaries and films https://documentary.net Explore the world beyond headlines with amazing videos. Wed, 08 Nov 2017 11:11:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://documentary.net/wp-content/themes/documentary/img/documentary-logo.png Documentary Network - Watch free documentaries and films https://documentary.net 337 17 Explore the world beyond headlines with amazing videos. An Open Secret https://documentary.net/video/an-open-secret/ https://documentary.net/video/an-open-secret/#respond Wed, 08 Nov 2017 11:08:10 +0000 https://documentary.net/?post_type=assets&p=12647

For three years, Amy Berg's documentary "An Open Secret" about paedophilia in Hollywood was virtually invisible. If you see it now, you know why. In light of the long awaited revelations of sexual abuse in Hollywood finally being reported ESPONDA PRODUCTIONS presents AN OPEN SECRET for free for a limited time . A film about the sexual abuse of children in the entertainment industry in Hollywood. Please support our efforts of raising awareness by sharing with your friends and colleagues. #AnOpenSecret #BeCourageus #ReportIt #LifeGetsBetter. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook @AnOpenSecret. BE COURAGEOUS. REPORT IT. LIFE GETS BETTER. Esponda Productions LLC is the author of this motion picture for purposes of copyright and other laws. Ownership of this motion picture is protected by copyright laws and other applicable laws, and any unauthorized duplication of this motion picture could result in certain criminal prosecution and civil liability.]]>

For three years, Amy Berg's documentary "An Open Secret" about paedophilia in Hollywood was virtually invisible. If you see it now, you know why. In light of the long awaited revelations of sexual abuse in Hollywood finally being reported ESPONDA PRODUCTIONS presents AN OPEN SECRET for free for a limited time . A film about the sexual abuse of children in the entertainment industry in Hollywood. Please support our efforts of raising awareness by sharing with your friends and colleagues. #AnOpenSecret #BeCourageus #ReportIt #LifeGetsBetter. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook @AnOpenSecret. BE COURAGEOUS. REPORT IT. LIFE GETS BETTER. Esponda Productions LLC is the author of this motion picture for purposes of copyright and other laws. Ownership of this motion picture is protected by copyright laws and other applicable laws, and any unauthorized duplication of this motion picture could result in certain criminal prosecution and civil liability.]]>
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Drone wars: Recruited video gamers become killers https://documentary.net/video/drone-wars-the-gamers-recruited-to-kill-guardian-docs/ https://documentary.net/video/drone-wars-the-gamers-recruited-to-kill-guardian-docs/#respond Fri, 22 Sep 2017 12:14:14 +0000 https://documentary.net/?post_type=assets&p=12642

In tiny bunkers in the United States, young pilots are operating unmanned drones targeting 'bad people' in Pakistan. The military visits video game fairs to recruit video players. Through specially developed games they try to reach young players. The traumatic experiences that these people are going through stay. Often the young new soldiers have no idea what to expect. This video highlights the effects on their actions  ]]>

In tiny bunkers in the United States, young pilots are operating unmanned drones targeting 'bad people' in Pakistan. The military visits video game fairs to recruit video players. Through specially developed games they try to reach young players. The traumatic experiences that these people are going through stay. Often the young new soldiers have no idea what to expect. This video highlights the effects on their actions  ]]>
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Can Universal Basic Income End Our Cultural Obsession With Work? https://documentary.net/video/can-universal-basic-income-end-our-cultural-obsession-with-work-philosopher-andrew-taggart/ https://documentary.net/video/can-universal-basic-income-end-our-cultural-obsession-with-work-philosopher-andrew-taggart/#respond Thu, 21 Sep 2017 11:46:03 +0000 https://documentary.net/?post_type=assets&p=12636

In 1948, German philosopher Josef Pieper predicted that society was headed for a dystopia he called 'Total Work'. With most of us in 2017 working too long, missing social events, working on weekends, and egging on our older years just for the retirement, practical philosopher Andrew Taggart believes we have reached the verge of that dystopia. He describes the conditions that are tightening around us—our lives are scheduled around the needs of our jobs, our time with family and friends is subordinated to it (in a 5:2 ratio!), and our free time increasingly resembles work, in vocabulary and in action: we run errands, aim to have "productive" days, try to rest so that we are fresh for Monday—the start of another week. Taggart thinks Universal Basic Income is the ideological push we need to begin questioning how we can cut loose from our cultural obsession with work, and how we might live in a world without it. Are we human beings, or instruments of productivity? Has our intense focus on work become pathological? Transcript:'Total work' was a term coined by Josef Pieper, a lesser known German philosopher from the 20th century, and he was concerned that after World War II there would be a time of total work. By that I take him to mean that work comes to be the center around which the world turns. Human beings start to see themselves chiefly as workers, and the entirety of life becomes more and more work, or work like. To see this we can begin to examine a number of what I might call tightening conditions. So the first condition would be the centrality of work. We've come to think that work is actually the center and everything else begins to turn around it. To see this more clearly we can think about the fact that we woke up to go to work today or that we are going home from work today. That we are preparing for work. That we are preparing to leave work. And this is happening all the way around the world. Meanwhile we’re adjusting our schedules, the rest of our lives, so that they are turning about it. So that would be the first condition. The second condition is subordination. That everything else in life comes to seem as if it’s subordinate to, and to be put in the service of, work. We can think of sleeping: the idea is that we wish to sleep well today in order to be focused and prepared for work. And that when we’re at work we wish to be as productive as possible. So sleep becomes that which is an instrument in the service of productivity. And we can play that game with all sorts of different instances. The third condition is the resemblance claim. It seems as if everything else in life comes to resemble work, more and more. So you can think of, on a day off you are wanting to be as productive as possible, thinking about how much you got done. You can begin to think about all the ways in which you plan and schedule time with children. The terms that begin to mark out our lives even when we’re not actually working sound more and more work like. And the last condition I think is the most intense and that’s what I might call cultural forgetfulness. Well suppose there were to come to pass Universal Basic Income. And suppose, for the sake of argument, that that were sufficient to meet our material needs—that is, those concerned with having enough food, proper shelter, sufficient warmth, sufficient coldness, and the like, so that it was enough. As one philosopher, Harry Frankfurt, calls it we have doctrine of sufficiency. So suppose basic income allowed us all to have enough. Then once again I think we would need to think about what we would do with ourselves. Aristotle in 'Politics' says, really quite famously, that we non-leisure in order to have leisure. And that was the way that it would be translated: we non-leisure in order to have leisure. The question is how are we going to dwell on our leisure?And I think we’ve been educated to a point at which we really don’t know how to answer that question. People, I think, are struck by a very difficult condition, which is a medieval condition, called acedia.]]>

In 1948, German philosopher Josef Pieper predicted that society was headed for a dystopia he called 'Total Work'. With most of us in 2017 working too long, missing social events, working on weekends, and egging on our older years just for the retirement, practical philosopher Andrew Taggart believes we have reached the verge of that dystopia. He describes the conditions that are tightening around us—our lives are scheduled around the needs of our jobs, our time with family and friends is subordinated to it (in a 5:2 ratio!), and our free time increasingly resembles work, in vocabulary and in action: we run errands, aim to have "productive" days, try to rest so that we are fresh for Monday—the start of another week. Taggart thinks Universal Basic Income is the ideological push we need to begin questioning how we can cut loose from our cultural obsession with work, and how we might live in a world without it. Are we human beings, or instruments of productivity? Has our intense focus on work become pathological? Transcript:'Total work' was a term coined by Josef Pieper, a lesser known German philosopher from the 20th century, and he was concerned that after World War II there would be a time of total work. By that I take him to mean that work comes to be the center around which the world turns. Human beings start to see themselves chiefly as workers, and the entirety of life becomes more and more work, or work like. To see this we can begin to examine a number of what I might call tightening conditions. So the first condition would be the centrality of work. We've come to think that work is actually the center and everything else begins to turn around it. To see this more clearly we can think about the fact that we woke up to go to work today or that we are going home from work today. That we are preparing for work. That we are preparing to leave work. And this is happening all the way around the world. Meanwhile we’re adjusting our schedules, the rest of our lives, so that they are turning about it. So that would be the first condition. The second condition is subordination. That everything else in life comes to seem as if it’s subordinate to, and to be put in the service of, work. We can think of sleeping: the idea is that we wish to sleep well today in order to be focused and prepared for work. And that when we’re at work we wish to be as productive as possible. So sleep becomes that which is an instrument in the service of productivity. And we can play that game with all sorts of different instances. The third condition is the resemblance claim. It seems as if everything else in life comes to resemble work, more and more. So you can think of, on a day off you are wanting to be as productive as possible, thinking about how much you got done. You can begin to think about all the ways in which you plan and schedule time with children. The terms that begin to mark out our lives even when we’re not actually working sound more and more work like. And the last condition I think is the most intense and that’s what I might call cultural forgetfulness. Well suppose there were to come to pass Universal Basic Income. And suppose, for the sake of argument, that that were sufficient to meet our material needs—that is, those concerned with having enough food, proper shelter, sufficient warmth, sufficient coldness, and the like, so that it was enough. As one philosopher, Harry Frankfurt, calls it we have doctrine of sufficiency. So suppose basic income allowed us all to have enough. Then once again I think we would need to think about what we would do with ourselves. Aristotle in 'Politics' says, really quite famously, that we non-leisure in order to have leisure. And that was the way that it would be translated: we non-leisure in order to have leisure. The question is how are we going to dwell on our leisure?And I think we’ve been educated to a point at which we really don’t know how to answer that question. People, I think, are struck by a very difficult condition, which is a medieval condition, called acedia.]]>
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The collapse of Venezuela, explained https://documentary.net/video/the-collapse-of-venezuela-explained/ https://documentary.net/video/the-collapse-of-venezuela-explained/#respond Fri, 25 Aug 2017 14:05:50 +0000 https://documentary.net/?post_type=assets&p=12629

The collapse of Venezuela and President Maduro's rise to dictatorship. Venezuela was once the richest country in Latin America. It has the largest known oil reserves in the world. And its democratic government was once praised world wide. But today, Venezuela’s democratic institutions and its economy are in shambles. The country has the highest inflation in the world, making food and medicine inaccessible to most Venezuelans. Over the last four years, its GDP has fallen 35%, which is a sharper drop than the one seen during the Great Depression in the US. The country’s murder rate has surpassed that of the most dangerous cities in the world. These conditions have sparked months of protests against the president, Nicolas Maduro. And it’s easy to see why: the country has become measurably worse since his election in 2013.  ]]>

The collapse of Venezuela and President Maduro's rise to dictatorship. Venezuela was once the richest country in Latin America. It has the largest known oil reserves in the world. And its democratic government was once praised world wide. But today, Venezuela’s democratic institutions and its economy are in shambles. The country has the highest inflation in the world, making food and medicine inaccessible to most Venezuelans. Over the last four years, its GDP has fallen 35%, which is a sharper drop than the one seen during the Great Depression in the US. The country’s murder rate has surpassed that of the most dangerous cities in the world. These conditions have sparked months of protests against the president, Nicolas Maduro. And it’s easy to see why: the country has become measurably worse since his election in 2013.  ]]>
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Rebranding White Nationalism: Inside Richard Spencer’s Alt-Right https://documentary.net/video/rebranding-white-nationalism-inside-richard-spencers-alt-right/ https://documentary.net/video/rebranding-white-nationalism-inside-richard-spencers-alt-right/#respond Mon, 14 Aug 2017 09:03:52 +0000 https://documentary.net/?post_type=assets&p=12625

Richard B. Spencer greeted an audience of more than 200 at an alt-right conference in Washington D.C. last month with the cry, “Hail Trump, hail our people, hail victory!” He was met with enthusiastic cheers and Nazi salutes, and The Atlantic’s clip made headlines. In this documentary, we go further inside Spencer’s ethnocentric worldview to understand what his plans are for the so-called alt-right—namely, to bring white nationalism out of the shadows. "I don't see myself as a marginal figure who's going to be hated by society. I see myself as a mainstream figure,” he said. Spencer and other alt-right leaders see Donald Trump’s rise as the first step towards a whites-only state. "Our lived experience is being a young, white person in 21st century America, [and] seeing your identity be demeaned,” Spencer said. “I’ve lived in this multicultural mess for years and I’m trying to get out of it." Author: Daniel Lombroso  ]]>

Richard B. Spencer greeted an audience of more than 200 at an alt-right conference in Washington D.C. last month with the cry, “Hail Trump, hail our people, hail victory!” He was met with enthusiastic cheers and Nazi salutes, and The Atlantic’s clip made headlines. In this documentary, we go further inside Spencer’s ethnocentric worldview to understand what his plans are for the so-called alt-right—namely, to bring white nationalism out of the shadows. "I don't see myself as a marginal figure who's going to be hated by society. I see myself as a mainstream figure,” he said. Spencer and other alt-right leaders see Donald Trump’s rise as the first step towards a whites-only state. "Our lived experience is being a young, white person in 21st century America, [and] seeing your identity be demeaned,” Spencer said. “I’ve lived in this multicultural mess for years and I’m trying to get out of it." Author: Daniel Lombroso  ]]>
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The Happiest People on Earth. North Korea: Rulers, citizens & official narrative https://documentary.net/video/the-happiest-people-on-earth-north-korea/ https://documentary.net/video/the-happiest-people-on-earth-north-korea/#respond Mon, 03 Jul 2017 05:28:23 +0000 https://documentary.net/?post_type=assets&p=12620

North Koreans say they’re the happiest people in the world. Their great leader is like a father who takes care of them and all their needs. They’re told that he’s made their country the most powerful and economically developed on the planet. A quick look at the World Wide Web or any international media might lead to a different conclusion but in North Korea, they’re banned.]]>

North Koreans say they’re the happiest people in the world. Their great leader is like a father who takes care of them and all their needs. They’re told that he’s made their country the most powerful and economically developed on the planet. A quick look at the World Wide Web or any international media might lead to a different conclusion but in North Korea, they’re banned.]]>
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Money, happiness and eternal life – Greed https://documentary.net/video/greed/ https://documentary.net/video/greed/#respond Mon, 12 Jun 2017 15:50:33 +0000 https://documentary.net/?post_type=assets&p=12615

Can money and power ever make us happy? How much is enough? Our constant desire for more is part of our human nature.But is greed getting the better of us? Find out in GREED - A FATAL DESIRE. From Buddhists and bankers to Eskimos and psychologists, we explore the phenomenon of greed with people from all walks of life. How can it be defined? What makes us greedy? And what are the repercussions? People like to have a lot of stuff because it gives them the feeling of living forever," says American social psychologist Sheldon Solomon. He thinks we have to come to terms with our own mortality before we can break the cycle. Are there other ways to feel happy and content? Can we simply stop being greedy by changing the way we think? 2 parts video]]>

Can money and power ever make us happy? How much is enough? Our constant desire for more is part of our human nature.But is greed getting the better of us? Find out in GREED - A FATAL DESIRE. From Buddhists and bankers to Eskimos and psychologists, we explore the phenomenon of greed with people from all walks of life. How can it be defined? What makes us greedy? And what are the repercussions? People like to have a lot of stuff because it gives them the feeling of living forever," says American social psychologist Sheldon Solomon. He thinks we have to come to terms with our own mortality before we can break the cycle. Are there other ways to feel happy and content? Can we simply stop being greedy by changing the way we think? 2 parts video]]>
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The real value of your personal data https://documentary.net/video/the-real-value-of-your-personal-data/ https://documentary.net/video/the-real-value-of-your-personal-data/#respond Mon, 12 Jun 2017 15:43:42 +0000 https://documentary.net/?post_type=assets&p=12612

The personal data that is being collected by internet companies has turned into a goldmine. The applications for this enormous mountain of data is endless, from health care uses to marketeers who can accurately predict your behavior. But who is making money from your data? And who owns your personal data? Personal data is being collected constantly. Smartphones send your location data, internet browsers store which websites you visited and credit card companies carefully register your buying patterns. One would say that all this personal data is being used to send you advertisements and banners. But that’s just the start. Your data is not only used to understand who you are right now, but also what your life will look like in the future, because that is where the big money is. Could we regain the control over our own personal data, so that we can share in the profits? Due to huge flow of information, one can tell who we are today and what we will do tomorrow. Can we get control of our own data? Information is collected and stored on your behalf. Via mobile phone and computer, every step you take is saved and analyzed. By companies like Google, Facebook, Apple and Twitter, among others. This precious personal data is not just saved. There are now new valuable uses for your data, giving your personal data the worth of gold. Data centers full of your personal data are the heart of what is called Big Data. A treasure of valuable new insights, derived from your location data, emails, photos, text messages, and more from your digital production. Because your personal data is not only used to send customized ads. Your data is used to predict your future behavior. Through smart analyzes of all your behavior that you leave behind on your mobile phone and computer, it’s easy to find out who you are. And that's not that hard, it turns out. For example, the University of Cambridge just by looking at which buttons you click on Facebook, can see if your parents are divorced, whether you are gay, and so on. Predicting human behavior, possible thanks to all your personal data, can help to design cities better, combat diseases and prevent wars. But if all of your personal data is so valuable, then shouldn’t it be time for you to get control of it? And also take part of that profit for yourself? Credits: Directed by: Martijn Kieft Research: Marijntje Denters/ Jasper Koning/ Chris Vijn Production: Jenny Borger, Hellen Goossens Editors in chief: Henneke Hagen/ Frank Wiering English, French and Spanish subtitles: Ericsson. French and Spanish subtitles are co-funded by European Union.]]>

The personal data that is being collected by internet companies has turned into a goldmine. The applications for this enormous mountain of data is endless, from health care uses to marketeers who can accurately predict your behavior. But who is making money from your data? And who owns your personal data? Personal data is being collected constantly. Smartphones send your location data, internet browsers store which websites you visited and credit card companies carefully register your buying patterns. One would say that all this personal data is being used to send you advertisements and banners. But that’s just the start. Your data is not only used to understand who you are right now, but also what your life will look like in the future, because that is where the big money is. Could we regain the control over our own personal data, so that we can share in the profits? Due to huge flow of information, one can tell who we are today and what we will do tomorrow. Can we get control of our own data? Information is collected and stored on your behalf. Via mobile phone and computer, every step you take is saved and analyzed. By companies like Google, Facebook, Apple and Twitter, among others. This precious personal data is not just saved. There are now new valuable uses for your data, giving your personal data the worth of gold. Data centers full of your personal data are the heart of what is called Big Data. A treasure of valuable new insights, derived from your location data, emails, photos, text messages, and more from your digital production. Because your personal data is not only used to send customized ads. Your data is used to predict your future behavior. Through smart analyzes of all your behavior that you leave behind on your mobile phone and computer, it’s easy to find out who you are. And that's not that hard, it turns out. For example, the University of Cambridge just by looking at which buttons you click on Facebook, can see if your parents are divorced, whether you are gay, and so on. Predicting human behavior, possible thanks to all your personal data, can help to design cities better, combat diseases and prevent wars. But if all of your personal data is so valuable, then shouldn’t it be time for you to get control of it? And also take part of that profit for yourself? Credits: Directed by: Martijn Kieft Research: Marijntje Denters/ Jasper Koning/ Chris Vijn Production: Jenny Borger, Hellen Goossens Editors in chief: Henneke Hagen/ Frank Wiering English, French and Spanish subtitles: Ericsson. French and Spanish subtitles are co-funded by European Union.]]>
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Gaming Through New Eyes: Born Blind, Gamer with Passion https://documentary.net/video/gaming-through-new-eyes/ https://documentary.net/video/gaming-through-new-eyes/#respond Tue, 23 May 2017 11:35:55 +0000 https://documentary.net/?post_type=assets&p=12606

This is a short documentary about Toby Ott, a man who was born with Bilateral Anopthalmia, or in other words, without eyes. This didn't stop him from discovering the medium of video games, and his childhood interest grew into a lifelong passion. This is a whole new perspective on video games, from the imagination of someone who has never known what it is to have sight. Berk Icel was inspired to shoot this documentary when Toby emailed him to express how much he enjoyed the content on his channel. After he learned that he had been blind since birth he wanted to know more, and as their correspondence progressed he felt compelled to visit him to hear his story and share it with the world. This was a solo 0 budget filmmaking project whose core premise was to tell Toby's story in the hope that it might encourage developers to add greater accessibility features for the blind.  ]]>

This is a short documentary about Toby Ott, a man who was born with Bilateral Anopthalmia, or in other words, without eyes. This didn't stop him from discovering the medium of video games, and his childhood interest grew into a lifelong passion. This is a whole new perspective on video games, from the imagination of someone who has never known what it is to have sight. Berk Icel was inspired to shoot this documentary when Toby emailed him to express how much he enjoyed the content on his channel. After he learned that he had been blind since birth he wanted to know more, and as their correspondence progressed he felt compelled to visit him to hear his story and share it with the world. This was a solo 0 budget filmmaking project whose core premise was to tell Toby's story in the hope that it might encourage developers to add greater accessibility features for the blind.  ]]>
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A Taste of New York https://documentary.net/video/a-taste-of-new-york/ https://documentary.net/video/a-taste-of-new-york/#respond Sun, 21 May 2017 11:09:25 +0000 https://documentary.net/?post_type=assets&p=12603

It took 10 days, a lot of burgers and one helicopter ride to produce this video. 10 days is very little time to discover this city of endless opportunities, so we hardly slept anything and shot day and night for this time lapse film. The city that never sleeps indeed! The Taxishot: Over the 10 days we took photos of yellow cabs whenever we had time to from as many different angles as possible. So we gathered 2000 (!) photos in total we had to sort afterwards and compile to a hyperlapse around a cab in post production. It took us 5 whole days in post production to get this one shot. Technical Details: In 10 days we shot 65.000 Photos taking up 2,6 TB of our hard drives. The final 3 minute video took 36h to render on the best equipped iMac available.  ]]>

It took 10 days, a lot of burgers and one helicopter ride to produce this video. 10 days is very little time to discover this city of endless opportunities, so we hardly slept anything and shot day and night for this time lapse film. The city that never sleeps indeed! The Taxishot: Over the 10 days we took photos of yellow cabs whenever we had time to from as many different angles as possible. So we gathered 2000 (!) photos in total we had to sort afterwards and compile to a hyperlapse around a cab in post production. It took us 5 whole days in post production to get this one shot. Technical Details: In 10 days we shot 65.000 Photos taking up 2,6 TB of our hard drives. The final 3 minute video took 36h to render on the best equipped iMac available.  ]]>
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HOPPTORNET (TEN METER TOWER) https://documentary.net/video/hopptornet-ten-meter-tower/ https://documentary.net/video/hopptornet-ten-meter-tower/#respond Sun, 21 May 2017 11:02:31 +0000 https://documentary.net/?post_type=assets&p=12600

Would you jump? Or would you chicken out? Our objective in making this film was something of a psychology experiment: We sought to capture people facing a difficult situation, to make a portrait of humans in doubt. We’ve all seen actors playing doubt in fiction films, but we have few true images of the feeling in documentaries. To make them, we decided to put people in a situation powerful enough not to need any classic narrative framework. A high dive seemed like the perfect scenario. Through an online advertisement, we found 67 people who had never been on a 10-meter (about 33 feet) diving tower before, and had never jumped from that high. We paid each of them the equivalent of about $30 to participate — which meant climbing up to the diving board and walking to its edge. We were as interested in the people who decided to climb back down as the ones jumping. We filmed it all with six cameras and several microphones. It was important for us not to conceal the fact that this was an arranged situation, and thus we chose to show the microphones within the frame. Ultimately, about 70 percent of those who climbed did jump. We noticed that the presence of the camera as well as the social pressure (from those awaiting their turn beside the pool) pushed some of the participants to jump, which made their behavior even more interesting. In our films, which we often call studies, we want to portray human behavior, rather than tell our own stories about it. We hope the result is a series of meaningful references, in the form of moving images. “Ten Meter Tower” may take place in Sweden, but we think it elucidates something essentially human, that transcends culture and origins. Overcoming our most cautious impulses with bravery unites all humankind. It’s something that has shaped us through the ages.  ]]>

Would you jump? Or would you chicken out? Our objective in making this film was something of a psychology experiment: We sought to capture people facing a difficult situation, to make a portrait of humans in doubt. We’ve all seen actors playing doubt in fiction films, but we have few true images of the feeling in documentaries. To make them, we decided to put people in a situation powerful enough not to need any classic narrative framework. A high dive seemed like the perfect scenario. Through an online advertisement, we found 67 people who had never been on a 10-meter (about 33 feet) diving tower before, and had never jumped from that high. We paid each of them the equivalent of about $30 to participate — which meant climbing up to the diving board and walking to its edge. We were as interested in the people who decided to climb back down as the ones jumping. We filmed it all with six cameras and several microphones. It was important for us not to conceal the fact that this was an arranged situation, and thus we chose to show the microphones within the frame. Ultimately, about 70 percent of those who climbed did jump. We noticed that the presence of the camera as well as the social pressure (from those awaiting their turn beside the pool) pushed some of the participants to jump, which made their behavior even more interesting. In our films, which we often call studies, we want to portray human behavior, rather than tell our own stories about it. We hope the result is a series of meaningful references, in the form of moving images. “Ten Meter Tower” may take place in Sweden, but we think it elucidates something essentially human, that transcends culture and origins. Overcoming our most cautious impulses with bravery unites all humankind. It’s something that has shaped us through the ages.  ]]>
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Abu’s Story https://documentary.net/video/abus-story/ https://documentary.net/video/abus-story/#respond Thu, 18 May 2017 13:38:03 +0000 https://documentary.net/?post_type=assets&p=12596

When Abu was 15, he discovered the potential of machine learning. Now what he’s building could help doctors and patients all over the world. Originally from Afghanistan, Abu came to the United States with his family when he was a child. He first came into contact with machine tools in the first year at high school.  In a programming course, the students should then develop something that shows how to solve a problem using technology. "All the others have been working on a calendar," the student said. However, he wanted to create something that can really help other people. So he set himself the ambitious goal of being able to diagnose breast cancer more reliably.]]>

When Abu was 15, he discovered the potential of machine learning. Now what he’s building could help doctors and patients all over the world. Originally from Afghanistan, Abu came to the United States with his family when he was a child. He first came into contact with machine tools in the first year at high school.  In a programming course, the students should then develop something that shows how to solve a problem using technology. "All the others have been working on a calendar," the student said. However, he wanted to create something that can really help other people. So he set himself the ambitious goal of being able to diagnose breast cancer more reliably.]]>
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Kish – How to see using sound https://documentary.net/video/kish/ https://documentary.net/video/kish/#respond Thu, 18 May 2017 13:27:42 +0000 https://documentary.net/?post_type=assets&p=12593

Daniel Kish lost his eyesight at the age of 1, but taught himself how to see using sound. "Somehow, I've earned the moniker, "the remarkable Batman." Now, Batman I will accept. Bats are cool. Batman is cool. But I was not raised to think of myself as in any way remarkable. I have always regarded myself much like anyone else who navigates the dark unknowns of their own challenges. Is that so remarkable? I do not use my eyes, I use my brain." - Daniel Kish]]>

Daniel Kish lost his eyesight at the age of 1, but taught himself how to see using sound. "Somehow, I've earned the moniker, "the remarkable Batman." Now, Batman I will accept. Bats are cool. Batman is cool. But I was not raised to think of myself as in any way remarkable. I have always regarded myself much like anyone else who navigates the dark unknowns of their own challenges. Is that so remarkable? I do not use my eyes, I use my brain." - Daniel Kish]]>
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The Internet Warriors https://documentary.net/video/the-internet-warriors/ https://documentary.net/video/the-internet-warriors/#respond Thu, 18 May 2017 13:25:05 +0000 https://documentary.net/?post_type=assets&p=12590

Why do so many people use the internet to harass and threaten people, and stretch the freedom of speech to its limits? Director Kyrre Lien meets a global group of strongly opinionated individuals, who spend their time debating online on the subjects they care most strongly about. Online platforms are their favourite tools to express the opinions that others might find objectionable in language that often offends. Do they behave in the same way when they come offline?]]>

Why do so many people use the internet to harass and threaten people, and stretch the freedom of speech to its limits? Director Kyrre Lien meets a global group of strongly opinionated individuals, who spend their time debating online on the subjects they care most strongly about. Online platforms are their favourite tools to express the opinions that others might find objectionable in language that often offends. Do they behave in the same way when they come offline?]]>
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See The Most Bombed Place On Earth https://documentary.net/video/see-the-most-bombed-place-on-earth/ https://documentary.net/video/see-the-most-bombed-place-on-earth/#respond Sat, 13 May 2017 13:53:29 +0000 http://documentary.net/?post_type=assets&p=12585

Building The Bomb: Extremely rare access to the Nevada test site for nuclear weapons. From 1951, over four decades, the US government carried out almost a thousand nuclear tests at this test site, earning it the nickname of the “most bombed place on Earth”. Here, they took the crude nuclear weapons that had been dropped over Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 and honed their destructive power. A hundred of these tests, known as atmospheric shots, took place above ground, creating the characteristic mushroom clouds that have become synonymous with nuclear detonations. The government still carries out classified work on the site, and access is limited to a small number of carefully vetted visitors each year, who are not allowed to take photographs.  ]]>

Building The Bomb: Extremely rare access to the Nevada test site for nuclear weapons. From 1951, over four decades, the US government carried out almost a thousand nuclear tests at this test site, earning it the nickname of the “most bombed place on Earth”. Here, they took the crude nuclear weapons that had been dropped over Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945 and honed their destructive power. A hundred of these tests, known as atmospheric shots, took place above ground, creating the characteristic mushroom clouds that have become synonymous with nuclear detonations. The government still carries out classified work on the site, and access is limited to a small number of carefully vetted visitors each year, who are not allowed to take photographs.  ]]>
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